"It is harder to demand MPs have longer to debate crucial bills once you spend a protracted period of time listening to them do so."

Ian Dunt, tweeted during the second day of the UK House of Commons debate on the Brexit bill

On time limits on speeches

Journalist and author Dale Smith’s latest column for Loonie Politics, “Debate management is a lost art in Canada” (which is paywalled) provides readers with an excellent overview of the decline of parliamentary debate in the Canadian House of Commons. Smith identifies a number of factors that have contributed to the dual problems of 1) the poor quality of debate and 2) time management problems that force governments to rely on time allocation and closure (issues I’ve blogged about extensively, most recently here). In particular, Smith targets the advent of speaking lists provided to the Speaker by Whips and party House leaders, and the reliance on prepared speeches that are then read. This combination creates a situation where there is no […]

UK Houses of Parliament

On Brexit and parliamentary power plays

Following the victory of the “Leave” side in the referendum on the UK’s status in the EU, Prime Minister David Cameron announced that he would resign as PM and leader of the Tory party in October — to give the party time to choose a new leader in time for their October Party Conference. For Canadians, if that seems like a really fast time frame in which to have a leadership change, they do party leadership properly — it’s largely in the hands of the party caucus. The party’s 1922 committee, a committee of all backbench Conservative MPs that meets weekly when the Commons is sitting,  will oversee the contest, most likely using the same rules used in the 2005 leadership […]

CANParl

On Government Motion No. 6

On the evening of May 17, 2016, in the Canadian House of Commons, the Government House Leader filed notice of a motion (Government Business No. 6) which, if adopted, would have imposed even greater, albeit temporary, Government control over the organization of House Business until the House adjourned for the summer. You can read the full text of the motion here, but be forewarned that without a detailed knowledge of the House’s Standing Orders, the text won’t mean much to you. Unsurprisingly, the Opposition parties were incensed by this move, and a question of privilege was raised in the House the next day by the New Democratic Party House Leader, Peter Julian. Mr. Julian argued that the “draconian” motion breached […]

CanadianHouseCommons

On Organizing House Business Sensibly

In the previous Canadian parliament, a question of privilege was raised concerning the then Government’s excessive recourse to time allocation and how these guillotine measures impacted Members from smaller parties. In the Canadian House of Commons, if a Member belongs to a party which has fewer than 12 elected members in the House, they do not have recognized party status and are treated as independents. Because virtually all procedures in the House of Commons are organized around parties (the officially recognized ones at least) rather than Members as the central agents, this means that the so-called “independent” MPs have extremely limited opportunities to participate in debates at the best of times. The recourse to time allocation on a bill more […]

Hdr_parliament

When a bill debate isn’t a bill debate

Last December, there was a flurry of excitement among Twitter followers of the UK’s Electoral Reform Society as the ERS urged its followers to watch the UK House of Commons debate a bill on proportional representation. This was picked up by Fair Votes Canada, who retweeted the ERS tweets and urged Canadians to follow this exciting bill debate. There was only one problem: there was no bill debate on proportional representation. What was transpiring in the UK House of Commons was a procedure known commonly as an 10-Minute Rule Bill, which is also rather misleading. It’s actually called a motion under Standing Order No. 23 (the “Ten Minute Rule”). Let me explain. In the UK House of Commons, there aren’t […]

David Cameron speaks during PMQs

Why a Canadian PMQs isn’t a good idea

The new Canadian Liberal Government led by Prime Minister Trudeau is exploring creating a “Prime Minister’s Question Period”. While no details are available yet — they are in the process of negotiating with the opposition parties — one assumes it would be similar to Britain’s Prime Minister’s Questions, or PMQs, that weekly half-hour where the Prime Minister alone takes questions from MPs from all sides. Much of the punditry discussion of implementing a similar procedure here in Canada tends to focus on the issue that, if he appeared in the House only once a week for questions, the Prime Minister would be less accountable to the House. Currently, for those who don’t follow Canadian politics much, all Ministers, including the […]