On Heckling in the Chamber

Samara’s recent report into heckling in the Canadian House of Commons (No One is Listening) proposes a number of recommendations to address the situation. It is important to stress that heckling is not a widespread problem. As others have pointed out, it’s a very localized phenomenon, largely limited to one proceeding: Question Period. This is true of pretty much every single Westminster-style parliament out there. If anyone bothered to watch all other parts of the average parliamentary day, this fact would quickly become quite clear to them. The bulk of the parliamentary day in the House of Commons is very decorous and respectful. The behaviours seen during Question Period are not the norm — far from it. The Samara Report […]

The Casting Vote and Confidence Matters

Normally, the Speaker in most Westminster-style parliaments does not participate in debate or vote. However, in the rare instances of a tied division result, the Speaker (except in New Zealand) is called upon to give what is called the casting vote to break the tie. Understandably, for the Speaker to command the trust and respect of the legislature, it is very important that the Speaker’s impartiality not be called into question. For this reason, there are three principles that guide the Speaker in the matter of casting votes. They are: That the Speaker should always vote for further discussion, where this is possible; That, where no further discussion is possible, decisions should not be taken except by a majority; and […]

"It is harder to demand MPs have longer to debate crucial bills once you spend a protracted period of time listening to them do so."

Ian Dunt, tweeted during the second day of the UK House of Commons debate on the Brexit bill

On time limits on speeches

Journalist and author Dale Smith’s latest column for Loonie Politics, “Debate management is a lost art in Canada” (which is paywalled) provides readers with an excellent overview of the decline of parliamentary debate in the Canadian House of Commons. Smith identifies a number of factors that have contributed to the dual problems of 1) the poor quality of debate and 2) time management problems that force governments to rely on time allocation and closure (issues I’ve blogged about extensively, most recently here). In particular, Smith targets the advent of speaking lists provided to the Speaker by Whips and party House leaders, and the reliance on prepared speeches that are then read. This combination creates a situation where there is no […]

I was democratically elected leader of our party for a new kind of politics by 60% of Labour members and supporters, and I will not betray them by resigning. Today’s vote by MPs has no constitutional legitimacy. We are a democratic party, with a clear constitution. Our people need Labour party members, trade unionists and MPs to unite behind my leadership at a critical time for our country.

Jeremy Corbyn after losing confidence vote

Leadership Selection – A Cautionary Tale

When Conservative MP Michael Chong brought forward his Reform Act, which, before it was diluted to the point of irrelevance, would have codified in the Elections Canada Act how parties could trigger leadership reviews by giving party caucuses the right to set such an event in motion, many pundits were appalled by the notion that the caucus alone could do such a thing. It was “undemocratic” — the leader was elected by the party membership at large — how dare a handful of MPs go against the will of the membership! Other political observers, myself included, argued that Chong’s bill didn’t go far enough. How party leaders in Canada (both at the federal and provincial level) are selected may well […]

On Brexit and parliamentary power plays

Following the victory of the “Leave” side in the referendum on the UK’s status in the EU, Prime Minister David Cameron announced that he would resign as PM and leader of the Tory party in October — to give the party time to choose a new leader in time for their October Party Conference. For Canadians, if that seems like a really fast time frame in which to have a leadership change, they do party leadership properly — it’s largely in the hands of the party caucus. The party’s 1922 committee, a committee of all backbench Conservative MPs that meets weekly when the Commons is sitting,  will oversee the contest, most likely using the same rules used in the 2005 leadership […]

On Government Motion No. 6

On the evening of May 17, 2016, in the Canadian House of Commons, the Government House Leader filed notice of a motion (Government Business No. 6) which, if adopted, would have imposed even greater, albeit temporary, Government control over the organization of House Business until the House adjourned for the summer. You can read the full text of the motion here, but be forewarned that without a detailed knowledge of the House’s Standing Orders, the text won’t mean much to you. Unsurprisingly, the Opposition parties were incensed by this move, and a question of privilege was raised in the House the next day by the New Democratic Party House Leader, Peter Julian. Mr. Julian argued that the “draconian” motion breached […]